Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Overlooked Films: Shootin' Shell Fanner vs. Fanner 45


When I was a young cowpoke, my favorite shootin' iron was the Mattel Fanner 50 (above), which did not shoot plastic bullets. It just looked cool and felt great in the hand.

Then Mattel developed Shootin' Shell technology and introduced the Shootin' Shell Fanner (video below). Unfortunately, it was smaller (designed for smaller hands, maybe?) and seemed kind of wimpy compared to the original.

SHOOTIN' SHELL FANNER 50


What I didn't know at the time was that Mattel also made a Shootin' Shell Fanner 45, which was just as big as the original Fanner - and heavier - and shinier. I'm thinking it was one of the many toys that were, in those ancient times, not marketed on the West Coast. Anyway, I have one now, and it's by far the best of the Fanner family. Here it is in action . . .

SHOOTIN' SHELL FANNER 45

6 comments:

Joseph West said...

Gawd, I would've loved that beautiful revolver when I was a boy. Now I'm a bigger boy, I've got a Ruger Vaquero that looks just like it.
Joe West

Evan Lewis said...

I googled that Ruger, Joe, and danged if you ain't right. Now I wish I had one of those when I was little.

Rick said...

I had one of those when I was a kid. Holster was top cowhide and could have supported the real thing. Only problem with the pistol was I stopped to look for the plastic slugs to reload the shells which always got me picked off by the " indians." But that was ok because my five minute dead period allowed me to reload. Great toy.

Anonymous said...

I never had such a high-tech cap gun. Looking at the film I'm baffled as to how the bullets are propelled, since the caps are stuck on the outside of the shell casing. Somebody care to explain?
A.S.

Evan Lewis said...

The shell casing, which was metal, had a little spring in it. The gray plastic bullet tip was inserted in the shell, depressing the spring, and little tabs held it in the casing. The impact of the hammer activated the spring, releasing the tabs and propelling the bullet tip through the barrel. (It's possible the caps provided extra force, but I think they were mainly for sound and smoke.) Here's a photo of some shell casing and bullet tips:
http://www.freebirdcollectibles.com/uploads/1/5/6/8/15682414/7812808_orig.jpg

Joe Crawford said...

My dad took mine away as soon as he realized one of his .44 magnum shells would drop right in and could be fired by the hammer.