Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Comic Gallery: The Adventures of ALAN LADD (1949)



7 comments:

Anonymous said...

There is a story that DC Comics had planned to use the name "Alan Ladd" as the secret identity for Green Lantern, but they changed it to avoid possible legal action from Paramount or Ladd himself. That seems doubtful; Green Lantern (named "Alan Scott") first appeared in All-American Comics #16 in 1940, and Ladd did not become a big movie star until 1942.

There is another version that says they changed Ladd to Scott because "Alan Ladd" was (sort of) an anagram of "Aladdin" (Green Lantern's code name came from a sort of magic lamp that gave him super powers), and that seemed to be laying it on too thick. Then, when the real Ladd became a star, they kicked themselves for missing a chance at a lot of free publicity. That story seems more likely, though an anagram of Aladdin is no sillier than a lot of comic book characters' names.

And then the same company ended up publishing a comic starring the real Alan Ladd, anyway. Come to think of it, if there had been a Green Lantern movie back then, Ladd would have been a good choice to play Alan Scott.

Evan Lewis said...

Great stories. Thanks!

Richard said...

I had no idea Ladd had a comic. I wonder what other big stars (not including western stars, though Ladd did make westerns) of the time had one?

Evan Lewis said...

I've seen a Dick Powell comic.

Cap'n Bob said...

Bob Hope and Jerry Lewis had comics. So did the Three Stooges. I have a faint memory of Abbott and Costello, too. A number of detective/cop shows had comics. Dragnet, M Squad, etc.

Rick said...

Francis the Talking Mule had his own comic as well.

Anonymous said...

There was a "John Wayne Adventure Comics" in the early fifties. It was mostly westerns, but occasionally had war or other types of action stories.

Other than that, the comics based on movie stars seem to be westerns (Roy Rogers, Tom Mix, Tim Holt) or comedians (Hope, Lewis, Stooges, Abbott & Costello, Laurel & Hardy), and were based on the kind of characters they played.

Of course, there were a lot of comics based on movies and TV shows, often with photo covers of the stars.