Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Movie Editions: The Brasher Doubloon (The High Window)


As we saw yesterday, Tower Books titled their movie edition of Murder, My Sweet as Farewell, My Lovely. With this book they reverse course and use the movie rather than book title. Why? Beats me. Under the dust jacket is an ordinary edition of The High Window. The Brasher Doubloon was the second film adaption of the book. The first was a Mike Shayne flick with Lloyd Nolan called Time to Kill (1942).

Has anyone seen this one? Far as I know, it's never been commercially released on VHS or DVD, but there seem to be some homemade copies available. Having seen George Montgomery recently in in the old western series Cimarron City, it seems he might make a decent Marlowe.
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I have most of the various posters from this film, but the only really nice one is the 3-sheet below. This pic was scanned from an old snapshot of my bedroom wall. Someday I hope to have another wall big enough to hang it on.

8 comments:

Richard R. said...

This is a great series of posts you're doing, Evan.

I have not seen this, nor Time to Kill that you mention (is it available?) I'd kind of like to see them both, maybe this one would change my opinion of Montgomery as Marlowe.

Evan Lewis said...

I've seen Time to Kill and probably have it on tape from TV, but it doesn't seem to be commercially available.

Deka Black said...

The last poster is nice. And huge, three sheet is not a little one.

Evan Lewis said...

Yeah, a 3-sheet measures about 41" x 81", so it takes up a lot of wall. A nice one like this looks amazing. An ugly one (like the 3-sheet for Lady in the Lake) is horrible.

Randy Johnson said...

I've always wanted to see this one. Most of the other versions I have.

Evan Lewis said...

I'm thinking I may have to cough up the dough for one of the pirate DVDs.

Cap'n Bob Napier said...

I, too, haven't seen this one. Great posters.

Richard Heft said...

George Mongomery is the worst Marlowe of all time, IMHO. While the movie itself isn't bad, and is interestingly directed by John Brahm, Montgomery undercuts everyone else's work, and appears to be playing the stupidly lecherous Miles Archer rather than the thoughtfully melancholy, witty-crafty Philip Marlowe.